Cost & Insurance


Insurance at Knox Community Health Center

The Knox Community Health Center accepts most insurance plans including Medicare, Medicaid (including MCO’s) and private insurance. We recommend you calling your insurance company before making an appointment to see if KCHC is in your network.

KCHC also accepts cash, check, Visa, Mastercard, Discover and debit card payments.

Patients will receive a billing statement from the health center. Payments can be mailed or brought to the health center for processing. 


Sliding Fee Scale

Our mission is to provide quality and compassionate health care services to all in need, regardless of their ability to pay. For patients that are uninsured or underinsured, we offer a Sliding Fee Discount Program which can provide discounts on medical, dental and behavioral health services to individuals based on income and household size. 

To see if you qualify for the Sliding Fee Scale please bring the following documentation to your appointment:

  • Photo ID
  • Any current insurance (Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance) if applicable
  • 30 days proof of income for the entire household. Proof of income includes the following:
    • Paycheck stubs
    • W-2 tax forms
    • Disability benefits
    • Child support
    • Social Security
    • Retirement income
    • Zero-income affidavit form for patients with no income
Patients not able to provide this information will not be eligible for the Sliding Fee Scale.

The Sliding Fee Scale is based on the Federal Poverty Level guidelines and will be approved by the KCHC Governance Board. Any changes to a patient’s Sliding Fee Scale Plan resulting from Governance Board approval of newly published FPL guidelines will be effective at the patient’s next scheduled visit. 


Health Insurance Enrollment Assistance

Enrollment specialists are available to help you find a health insurance plan that meets your needs and budget. Questions about Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance? No problem, we are here to answer all of your questions. Call (309) 344-2225 to speak to a specialist today. 


Good Faith Estimate

Patients of the Knox Community Health Center who do not have insurance or who are not using insurance have the right to receive an estimate of the bill for medical, dental or behavioral health items and services.

For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 1-800-985-3059.


Glossary of commonly used health insurance terms

Benefit Period: When services are covered under your plan. It also defines the time when benefit maximums, deductibles and coinsurance limits build up. It has a start and end date. It is often one calendar year for health insurance plans.

Co-Insurance: The part you pay for a health care service that is covered under some health insurance plans. This co-insurance amount is a percent of the amount the service costs. The insurance company pays for the rest.

Co-Pay: A co-pay is the amount you must pay for a health care service such as an office visit or prescription. You pay this amount at the time of your appointment. The amount will be different for different health insurance plans. Co-pay is different than co-insurance and deductible. You may have to pay a co-insurance, a co-pay, and part of a deductible for one visit. Most insurance companies require doctors and other health care providers to collect this payment from the patient.

Deductible: A deductible is a fixed amount you must pay for health care services before the insurance will pay for services. This can be an individual amount or a family amount. Most of the time the deductible is for a fixed period, often for one year. The deductible may not apply to some services.

Health Insurance: Health insurance is a health care plan that pays for some or all costs for medical care. You have insurance if someone else such as your place of work or the government is paying for some or all your healthcare. Your insurance can be an individual plan that you buy, a plan from your place of work, a plan from a union at your place of work, or a government plan like Medicare or Medicaid.

Managed Care: Managed care is an insurance plan that offers health benefits, but the patient must use a defined network. For some health services, managed care may require you to get a referral or have the health services approved.

Network: All health care plans work with doctors, hospitals, clinics, and other health care providers. This group of health care providers working together is known as the health plan’s network.

​​​Preventive Service: This is a service to prevent you from getting sick or needing more health care later. For example, getting a flu shot is a type of preventative service, because it can prevent you from getting the flu. Another example of a preventive service is a routine dental exam and dental cleaning, which help maintain good oral health.

​​​Premium: Payments you make to your insurance provider to keep your coverage. The payments are due at certain times.

Provider (Healthcare Provider): A hospital, facility, physician or other licensed healthcare professional.

Out-of-Pocket Cost: Cost you must pay. Out-of-pocket costs vary by plan and each plan has a maximum out of pocket (MOOP) cost. Consult your health insurance plan for more information as it varies by organizations.

Source: https://www.healthcare.gov/glossary/